Grant Recipients

Congratulations to all our current and past Fellowship and Assistantship award winners!

Award winners by year

Congratulations to all our 2018 Fellowship and Assistantship award winners!

Research Assistantship Recipients (2018)

Franz Krause
University of Cologne, Germany
On the land and in the water: connecting and disconnecting the Mackenzie Delta

 Franz is studying current uses and meanings associated with the Mackenzie Delta, focusing on people living around Aklavik. This will include information on people's livelihood practices, mobility, and senses of belonging, in particular in relation to the delta's social and ecological volatility and people's creative responses.

Steven Mamet
University of Saskatchewan
Permafrost and ecological change in the eastern Selwyn/western Mackenzie Mountains

Steven is researching to gain an improved understanding of both vegetative and environmental limiting factors in the North. He will study what increasing temperatures, longer growing seasons, and thawing permafrost mean for subarctic environments and plant communities.

Mary Ollier
University of Ottawa
On the land with Project Jewel: A community-based research project in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region.

Mary is seeking to understand if/how on-the-land programming offers culturally safe experiences that meet the self-identified needs of the residents of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. Land-based initiatives for Aboriginal populations are intended to reinforce cultural identity and enhance resiliency. This project will draw upon the experiences of participants in the IRC's program Project Jewel.

Lia Ruttan
Independent Scholar
"We had a good mind to do it": Oral Histories of Aboriginal Forest Firefighters from Ft. Smith, NT

Lia is studying oral histories of aboriginal people about fighting forest fires in Fort Smith. Dene Elder Mary Heron, described the need to carry out one’s responsibility to the animals, lands, and waters. She went on to say, that fighting fire from this perspective brought good results, pride and good energy. Aboriginal forest firefighters from the Ft. Smith region agreed and initiated a request for research to explore, preserve and share their experience, knowledge and techniques.

 

Research Fellowship Recipients (2018)

Rebecca Goodwin
University of Western Ontario
Things past, things present: Inuvialuit perspectives on gender and the material record

Rebecca will use ethnographic methods in her study to document the relationships that Inuvialuit descendant communities have with “gendered” objects, both archaeological and modern. She seeks to include an Inuvialuit perspective on gender within the larger conversation about gender in the arctic past.

Erin MacDonald
University of Alberta
Carbon composition and microbial activity in permafrost-affected terrains

Erin will study how thaw slumps impact microbial community diversity in impacted-streams, and characterize organic carbon at multiple depths from different landscapes, and how this affects the rate of carbon decomposition. Permafrost thaw can release vast amounts of organic carbon, but the rate of decomposition will depend on both the microbial community and the type of the carbon material.

Mary Ollier
University of Ottawa
On the land with Project Jewel: A community-based research project in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region

Mary is seeking to understand if/how on-the-land programming offers culturally safe experiences that meet the self-identified needs of the residents of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. Land-based initiatives for Aboriginal populations are intended to reinforce cultural identity and enhance resiliency. This project will draw upon the experiences of participants in the IRC's program Project Jewel.

Mike Palmer
Carleton University
An investigation of the factors inhibiting the chemical recovery of Yellowknife area lakes from 50 years of arsenic pollution

Mike is researching catchment and within-lake processes that are impeding the natural recovery of lakes after mining activity. Lakes near historical mining operations in the Yellowknife area continue to show signs of arsenic contamination almost 60 years after the bulk of arsenic was deposited across the landscape from legacy ore roasting operations.

2017

2016

2015

2014