Greg Elias


Greg Elias, Dip ENRTP
Technician
Western Arctic Research Centre (Inuvik)
P: 867-777-3298 ext. 239
E: Greg.Elias@auroracollege.nt.ca

 

 

 

I’m originally from Sachs Harbour, NWT. I enjoy being outdoors, whether it’s camping, hunting, or working. I decided that I wanted to become a Renewable Resource Officer for the Northwest Territories Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR). As an ENR Patrolman, I would issue licences, permits, and wildlife tags - but the main reason I wanted to work for ENR was because of the wildlife. I enjoy working with wildlife; whether it’s deterring animals, regulating hunting, or handling samples. Sachs Harbour is a small community, and making sure wildlife regulations were followed was a big part of my work.

In 2012, I moved to Inuvik to enroll in the Environment & Natural Resources Technology Program (ENRTP) at Aurora College. I graduated in 2015, and was awarded the Governor General’s Award for Academics. Afterward, I moved back to Sachs Harbour, but am now back in Inuvik for field work this summer. I look forward to putting my education and experience to good use. 

Skills and Expertise

  • Field work in remote locations
  • Maintenance and inventory of equipment
  • Operation of motorized equipment (e.g. boats, skidoo, ATVs)
  • Sample collection
  • Data entry
  • Research assistance
  • Coordination of logistics
  • Coordination and implementation of safety protocols

Current Projects

  • Air Quality Monitoring – I provide technical support and troubleshooting for this project.  This includes calibrating air sensors, performing weekly checks of the monitoring equipment, and getting the station back online following service disruptions.
  • Permafrost monitoring – I collect data from permafrost monitoring stations, convert the data, and enter the data for analysis.
  • River water sampling – I collect river water samples from the Mackenzie and Arctic Red Rivers.
  • Pile infrastructure monitoring – I download data from nine loggers attached to five piles which continuously record the ground temperature at different depths.